• Test flights of JD.com drones for rural deliveries

    published: 24 Aug 2016
  • China-based JD .com's rural drone deliveries

    China’s second largest e-tailer, JD.com has been making commercial drone deliveries in at least four pilot regions scattered across China since June 2016, see how deliveries are made. Source: JD.com

    published: 10 Feb 2017
  • Drone deliveries fight HIV infection in rural Africa

    "Unicef":http://www.unicef.org/media/media_90462.html along with the Malawi government are leading a trial based on the use of drones to reduce waiting times for HIV test results in infants living in rural areas. Malawi has a national HIV prevalence rate of 10 percent, still one of the highest in the world. Currently it can take almost two months to get samples from a healthcare facility to an equipped lab and for the results to be returned. Judith Sherman of Unicef HIV programme explained: "… READ MORE : http://www.euronews.com/2016/03/23/drone-deliveries-fight-hiv-infection-in-rural-africa euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com...

    published: 24 Mar 2016
  • Rural Delivery Series 12, Episode 23 Agrisea -6th August 2016

    AgriSea NZ Ltd is a multi award winning family owned and operated, sustainable NZ company, brewing nutrient applications from NZ seaweed, for soil plant and animal heath. AgriSea is committed to the NZ farming community and healthy functioning soil. They have recently embarked on a 3 year research programme to track the transition of high input chemical farms to biological farming methods, the end results of which are intended to produce safe pathways for farmers to transition and further proof of the efficacy of their products. AgriSea’s products grew from the early research of directors Jill Bradley and Keith Atwood. Travel and research confirmed to them that seaweed held enormous potential for farm health and productivity. French vineyards on the coast, known as the ‘Golden Belt’, have...

    published: 15 Aug 2016
  • The traditional midwives of Isiolo

    http://www.nation.co.ke Daily Nation reporter Joy Wanja Muraya took a trip to Isiolo to witness the process of childbirth in rural Kenya. Read the entire story on http://www.nation.co.ke/Features/DN2/Childbirth+the+age+old+way/-/957860/1509258/-/fwi2sn/-/index.html

    published: 19 Sep 2012
  • Wood chip fuel deliveries

    Deliveries of woodchip fuels to biomass boiler hoppers in rural Northumberland, using our DAF wagon and scissor trailer.

    published: 27 Jun 2011
  • Ensuring Safe Deliveries in Rural India

    23 year old Laxmi, of Vissanapeta, India, was a high risk pregnancy. HMRI's mobile health clinic service ensures the safe delivery of her child.

    published: 24 Feb 2010
  • Vayu's Drones Deliver Healthcare in Rural Madagascar

    On July 27, 2016, Michigan-based Vayu, Inc., in collaboration with the Stony Brook University Global Health Institute completed the first ever series of long-range, fully autonomous drone delivery flights with blood and stool samples, setting records in the process. The samples were flown from villages in rural Madagascar to Stony Brook University's Centre ValBio, a central testing facility located adjacent to Ranamafana National Park, over hilly terrain without any road infrastructure. The unique ability of Vayu’s delivery drone to take off and land anywhere solves that problem and helps vulnerable rural communities to get the medical care they deserve. “The flights to and from villages in the Ifanadiana district of Madagascar ushers in a new era in bringing healthcare to people living i...

    published: 04 Aug 2016
  • Break - How UPS Plans To Use Drones To Increase The Speed Of Their Deliveries

    Futurologists have been predicting that drones will eventually replace humans in the world of package delivery for years, but now UPS has unveiled a new system that could see man and robot work together in the name of getting parcels into the right hands. Cool new technology would allow individual drivers to make multiple deliveries simultaneous by employing drones that fly autonomously to their intended destination. While the driver makes traditional deliveries, a self-piloted drone would seamlessly transport goods to other recipients with next to no human input. According to UPS, the use of drones could help speed up rural deliveries and reduce their cost, as drivers would not need to clock more miles to make fewer deliveries when compared to urban centers. In response to concerns tha...

    published: 23 Feb 2017
  • Oil delivery in rural Maine

    In a bitter Maine winter, their small company, like many others, scrambles to keep customers warm.

    published: 12 Jan 2014
  • Urban & Rural Plants - Deliveries 2016

    The telehandler in action - a very tall Butia palm being unloaded

    published: 12 Mar 2016
  • Urban & Rural Plants - Deliveries 2016

    Unloading a big olive tree

    published: 12 Mar 2016
  • Being a mail carrier on the busiest delivery day of the year

    Monday marked the busiest shipping day of the year. Now it's only fitting that Wednesday is the busiest day for deliveries.

    published: 18 Dec 2014
  • Urban & Rural Plants - Deliveries 2016

    The telehandler in action - the biggest olive tree being unloaded

    published: 12 Mar 2016
  • Franz-Joseph Miller on same-day deliveries | WHU Inside Business

    Franz-Joseph Miller, co-founder & chairman of the board at Liefery and founder & CEO of time:matters, about challenges and opportunities in logistics for same-day deliveries. Recorded: 16th of September 2016. Interview overview: ► 0:17 Does time matter? ► 0:40 Why do people and companies demand same-day deliveries? ► 1:45 Why are traditional courier services not able to offer same-day service? ► 3:07 How do you keep costs under control without delivery consolidation? ► 4:00 Is 3D-printing a technology you are using or looking at for the future? ► 5:18 Do you imagine to have own 3D-printers or use them as a service? ► 5:27 The business of Liefery. ► 6:46 What would be the target time-span within which you want to deliver? ►7:40 What is your plan to roll out the business to more...

    published: 23 Jan 2017
  • What is RURAL FREE DELIVERY? What does RURAL FREE DELIVERY mean? RURAL FREE DELIVERY meaning

    What is RURAL FREE DELIVERY? What does RURAL FREE DELIVERY mean? RURAL FREE DELIVERY meaning - RURAL FREE DELIVERY definition - RURAL FREE DELIVERY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Rural Free Delivery (RFD) is a service which began in the United States in the late 19th century, to deliver mail directly to rural farm families. Prior to RFD, individuals living in more remote homesteads had to pick up mail themselves at sometimes distant post offices or pay private carriers for delivery. The proposal to offer free rural delivery was not universally embraced. Private carriers and local shopkeepers feared a loss of business. The postal service began experiments with Rural Free Delivery as early as 1890. However,...

    published: 21 Feb 2017
Test flights of JD.com drones for rural deliveries

Test flights of JD.com drones for rural deliveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:55
  • Updated: 24 Aug 2016
  • views: 2269
videos
https://wn.com/Test_Flights_Of_Jd.Com_Drones_For_Rural_Deliveries
China-based JD .com's rural drone deliveries

China-based JD .com's rural drone deliveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:08
  • Updated: 10 Feb 2017
  • views: 2098
videos
China’s second largest e-tailer, JD.com has been making commercial drone deliveries in at least four pilot regions scattered across China since June 2016, see how deliveries are made. Source: JD.com
https://wn.com/China_Based_Jd_.Com's_Rural_Drone_Deliveries
Drone deliveries fight HIV infection in rural Africa

Drone deliveries fight HIV infection in rural Africa

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:01
  • Updated: 24 Mar 2016
  • views: 284
videos
"Unicef":http://www.unicef.org/media/media_90462.html along with the Malawi government are leading a trial based on the use of drones to reduce waiting times for HIV test results in infants living in rural areas. Malawi has a national HIV prevalence rate of 10 percent, still one of the highest in the world. Currently it can take almost two months to get samples from a healthcare facility to an equipped lab and for the results to be returned. Judith Sherman of Unicef HIV programme explained: "… READ MORE : http://www.euronews.com/2016/03/23/drone-deliveries-fight-hiv-infection-in-rural-africa euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
https://wn.com/Drone_Deliveries_Fight_Hiv_Infection_In_Rural_Africa
Rural Delivery Series 12, Episode 23 Agrisea -6th August 2016

Rural Delivery Series 12, Episode 23 Agrisea -6th August 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:49
  • Updated: 15 Aug 2016
  • views: 369
videos
AgriSea NZ Ltd is a multi award winning family owned and operated, sustainable NZ company, brewing nutrient applications from NZ seaweed, for soil plant and animal heath. AgriSea is committed to the NZ farming community and healthy functioning soil. They have recently embarked on a 3 year research programme to track the transition of high input chemical farms to biological farming methods, the end results of which are intended to produce safe pathways for farmers to transition and further proof of the efficacy of their products. AgriSea’s products grew from the early research of directors Jill Bradley and Keith Atwood. Travel and research confirmed to them that seaweed held enormous potential for farm health and productivity. French vineyards on the coast, known as the ‘Golden Belt’, have used seaweed fertilizers for centuries and are producing great wines. Research has been at the heart of the company since its inception in 1996, starting with research into the efficacy of AgriSea products, originally for kiwifruit and subsequently moving into viticulture. Fast forward 20 years and AgriSea have an impressive array of products for the horticulture, agriculture, viticulture, bee keeping and equestrian industries. Their viticulture products are being used by 60% of vineyards in NZ. In the 90’s Europe wanted sustainable, low residue wines and NZ viticulturalists were quick to respond to market demands and get onboard with more biological farming methods. “We work closely with our farmers and we listen to them,” says Jill. A couple of newer products in their range were in direct response to farmer requests, for instance a seaweed salt lick for stock and a solid dry product. Sheep and beef farmers in areas with difficult access and some simply as a preference were wanting a solid product for application. Working with Blue Pacific Minerals, AgriSea developed a liquid seaweed concentrate that is infused into a zealite base. The seaweed concentrate takes 3 months to brew and is stirred by hand with paddles, every day. Research has been an important component for AgriSea – providing proof of the product efficacy to the end user. “Our responsibility is to do the research to show the efficacy of our product, if we don’t add value to a farming or growing business, we won’t sell to them”, says Jill. Up until now this research has been outsourced to organisations like the Cawthron Institute and Scion, but times are changing. Jill speaks of ‘biological farming’ as a continuum – high fertiliser input farming systems at one end and the biodynamic/organic systems at the other, with the biological farming system in the middle. She wants to see the significant movement from the high chemical input farming systems towards the middle ground. The benefits are healthier stock, healthier pasture and healthier soils that are better able to recover from drought and a better bottom line for farmers. About a year ago the family sat down and thought about these goals and made the decision to ‘put their money where their mouth was’. While the majority of research has been conducted by external parties to date, AgriSea has committed to their own 3 year research project – the Soils First Production System. The research aims to develop a system and track the transition of 6 high fertiliser input farms to biological farming methods over 3 years. The goal is to provide safe and effective pathways for farmers to transition to biological farming methods and also provide further proof of the efficacy of the AgriSea products.
https://wn.com/Rural_Delivery_Series_12,_Episode_23_Agrisea_6Th_August_2016
The traditional midwives of Isiolo

The traditional midwives of Isiolo

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:22
  • Updated: 19 Sep 2012
  • views: 4888061
videos
http://www.nation.co.ke Daily Nation reporter Joy Wanja Muraya took a trip to Isiolo to witness the process of childbirth in rural Kenya. Read the entire story on http://www.nation.co.ke/Features/DN2/Childbirth+the+age+old+way/-/957860/1509258/-/fwi2sn/-/index.html
https://wn.com/The_Traditional_Midwives_Of_Isiolo
Wood chip fuel deliveries

Wood chip fuel deliveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:04
  • Updated: 27 Jun 2011
  • views: 1050
videos
Deliveries of woodchip fuels to biomass boiler hoppers in rural Northumberland, using our DAF wagon and scissor trailer.
https://wn.com/Wood_Chip_Fuel_Deliveries
Ensuring Safe Deliveries in Rural India

Ensuring Safe Deliveries in Rural India

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:37
  • Updated: 24 Feb 2010
  • views: 995
videos
23 year old Laxmi, of Vissanapeta, India, was a high risk pregnancy. HMRI's mobile health clinic service ensures the safe delivery of her child.
https://wn.com/Ensuring_Safe_Deliveries_In_Rural_India
Vayu's Drones Deliver Healthcare in Rural Madagascar

Vayu's Drones Deliver Healthcare in Rural Madagascar

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:56
  • Updated: 04 Aug 2016
  • views: 25104
videos
On July 27, 2016, Michigan-based Vayu, Inc., in collaboration with the Stony Brook University Global Health Institute completed the first ever series of long-range, fully autonomous drone delivery flights with blood and stool samples, setting records in the process. The samples were flown from villages in rural Madagascar to Stony Brook University's Centre ValBio, a central testing facility located adjacent to Ranamafana National Park, over hilly terrain without any road infrastructure. The unique ability of Vayu’s delivery drone to take off and land anywhere solves that problem and helps vulnerable rural communities to get the medical care they deserve. “The flights to and from villages in the Ifanadiana district of Madagascar ushers in a new era in bringing healthcare to people living in really remote settings,” said Dr. Peter Small, the Founding Director of Stony Brook’s Global Health Institute. "This day would not have been possible without the support of the government and people of Madagascar. In this context, drones will find innumerable uses such as accelerating the diagnosis of tuberculosis and ensuring the delivery of vaccines.” This effort was made possible by generous support from the United States Agency for International Development. www.vayu.us
https://wn.com/Vayu's_Drones_Deliver_Healthcare_In_Rural_Madagascar
Break - How UPS Plans To Use Drones To Increase The Speed Of Their Deliveries

Break - How UPS Plans To Use Drones To Increase The Speed Of Their Deliveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:28
  • Updated: 23 Feb 2017
  • views: 13
videos
Futurologists have been predicting that drones will eventually replace humans in the world of package delivery for years, but now UPS has unveiled a new system that could see man and robot work together in the name of getting parcels into the right hands. Cool new technology would allow individual drivers to make multiple deliveries simultaneous by employing drones that fly autonomously to their intended destination. While the driver makes traditional deliveries, a self-piloted drone would seamlessly transport goods to other recipients with next to no human input. According to UPS, the use of drones could help speed up rural deliveries and reduce their cost, as drivers would not need to clock more miles to make fewer deliveries when compared to urban centers. In response to concerns that the drone technology could eventually eliminate the need for human delivery truck drivers, UPS has adopted a wait-and-see approach, claiming that it will not be able to see the big picture until drones are implemented on a larger scale. UPS’s inaugural home delivery tests took place this week in Lithia, Florida, which saw the drone take off from the truck’s roof, deliver the package, and return to the truck – all with minimal babysitting on the part of the driver.
https://wn.com/Break_How_Ups_Plans_To_Use_Drones_To_Increase_The_Speed_Of_Their_Deliveries
Oil delivery in rural Maine

Oil delivery in rural Maine

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:41
  • Updated: 12 Jan 2014
  • views: 3364
videos
In a bitter Maine winter, their small company, like many others, scrambles to keep customers warm.
https://wn.com/Oil_Delivery_In_Rural_Maine
Urban & Rural Plants - Deliveries 2016

Urban & Rural Plants - Deliveries 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:10
  • Updated: 12 Mar 2016
  • views: 118
videos
The telehandler in action - a very tall Butia palm being unloaded
https://wn.com/Urban_Rural_Plants_Deliveries_2016
Urban & Rural Plants - Deliveries 2016

Urban & Rural Plants - Deliveries 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:35
  • Updated: 12 Mar 2016
  • views: 13
videos
Unloading a big olive tree
https://wn.com/Urban_Rural_Plants_Deliveries_2016
Being a mail carrier on the busiest delivery day of the year

Being a mail carrier on the busiest delivery day of the year

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:10
  • Updated: 18 Dec 2014
  • views: 6195
videos
Monday marked the busiest shipping day of the year. Now it's only fitting that Wednesday is the busiest day for deliveries.
https://wn.com/Being_A_Mail_Carrier_On_The_Busiest_Delivery_Day_Of_The_Year
Urban & Rural Plants - Deliveries 2016

Urban & Rural Plants - Deliveries 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:51
  • Updated: 12 Mar 2016
  • views: 59
videos
The telehandler in action - the biggest olive tree being unloaded
https://wn.com/Urban_Rural_Plants_Deliveries_2016
Franz-Joseph Miller on same-day deliveries | WHU Inside Business

Franz-Joseph Miller on same-day deliveries | WHU Inside Business

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:53
  • Updated: 23 Jan 2017
  • views: 628
videos
Franz-Joseph Miller, co-founder & chairman of the board at Liefery and founder & CEO of time:matters, about challenges and opportunities in logistics for same-day deliveries. Recorded: 16th of September 2016. Interview overview: ► 0:17 Does time matter? ► 0:40 Why do people and companies demand same-day deliveries? ► 1:45 Why are traditional courier services not able to offer same-day service? ► 3:07 How do you keep costs under control without delivery consolidation? ► 4:00 Is 3D-printing a technology you are using or looking at for the future? ► 5:18 Do you imagine to have own 3D-printers or use them as a service? ► 5:27 The business of Liefery. ► 6:46 What would be the target time-span within which you want to deliver? ►7:40 What is your plan to roll out the business to more rural areas? ►9:00 Regarding future employees, do you look for IT-skills rather than business skills? What is the ideal background of an employee joining Liefery? ____________________________________________ The interview is hosted by Professor Dr. Stefan Spinler, Chairholder of the Kühne Institute for Logistics Management at the WHU - Otto Beisheim School of Management. https://www.whu.edu/en/faculty-research/supply-chain-management-group/kuehne-institute-for-logistics-management/logistics-management/team/ ____________________________________________ WHU Inside Business provides new insights directly from executives and managers in the areas of Digitalization, Supply-Chain-Management and Finance. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WHUInsideBusiness/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXQORms85IEPzjrY-asJrZw LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/whu-inside-business ____________________________________________ General Management Jöran Tobias Heikaus Operational Management Jon Gonder Marketing Jon Gonder Jöran Tobias Heikaus Simon Heesen Video Production Simon Heesen Alina Damm Jöran Tobias Heikaus Channel Management "Digitalization" Julia Seeger Simon Heesen Channel Management "Finance" Christopher Hoegner Celina Quirmbach Channel Management "Supply Chain Management" David Meyer Nadine Hennlich
https://wn.com/Franz_Joseph_Miller_On_Same_Day_Deliveries_|_Whu_Inside_Business
What is RURAL FREE DELIVERY? What does RURAL FREE DELIVERY mean? RURAL FREE DELIVERY meaning

What is RURAL FREE DELIVERY? What does RURAL FREE DELIVERY mean? RURAL FREE DELIVERY meaning

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:19
  • Updated: 21 Feb 2017
  • views: 48
videos
What is RURAL FREE DELIVERY? What does RURAL FREE DELIVERY mean? RURAL FREE DELIVERY meaning - RURAL FREE DELIVERY definition - RURAL FREE DELIVERY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Rural Free Delivery (RFD) is a service which began in the United States in the late 19th century, to deliver mail directly to rural farm families. Prior to RFD, individuals living in more remote homesteads had to pick up mail themselves at sometimes distant post offices or pay private carriers for delivery. The proposal to offer free rural delivery was not universally embraced. Private carriers and local shopkeepers feared a loss of business. The postal service began experiments with Rural Free Delivery as early as 1890. However, it was not until 1893, when Georgia Congressman Thomas E. Watson pushed through legislation, that the practice was mandated.[1] However, universal implementation was slow; RFD was not adopted generally in the United States Post Office until 1902.[2] The rural delivery service uses a network of rural routes traveled by carriers to deliver and pick up mail to and from roadside mailboxes.[3] Until the late 19th century, residents of rural areas had to either travel to a distant post office to pick up their mail, or else pay for delivery by a private carrier. Postmaster General John Wanamaker was ardently in favor of Rural Free Delivery (RFD),[4] as it was originally called, along with many thousands of Americans living in rural communities who wanted to send and receive mail inexpensively. However, the adoption of a nationwide RFD system had many opponents. Some were simply opposed to the cost of the service. Private express carriers thought inexpensive rural mail delivery would eliminate their business, and many town merchants worried the service would reduce farm families' weekly visits to town to obtain goods and merchandise, or that mail order merchants selling through catalogs, such as Sears, Roebuck and Company might present significant competition.[1][5] Much support for the introduction of a nationwide rural mail delivery service came from The National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, the nation's oldest agricultural organization.[4] Fayette County in east-central Indiana may be the birthplace of Rural Free Delivery. Milton Trusler, a leading farmer in the county, began advocating the idea in 1880; as the president of the Indiana Grange, he spoke to farmers statewide frequently over the following sixteen years.[6] The Post Office Department first experimented with the idea of rural mail delivery on October 1, 1891 to determine the viability of RFD. They began with five routes covering ten miles, 33 years after free delivery in cities had begun. The first routes to receive RFD during its experimental phase were in Jefferson County, West Virginia, near Charles Town, Halltown, and Uvilla.[7] Legislation by U.S. Congressman Thomas E. Watson of Georgia mandated the practice, and RFD finally became an official service in 1896.[1] That year, 82 rural routes were put into operation. A massive undertaking, nationwide RFD service took several years to implement, and remains the "biggest and most expensive endeavor"[8] ever instituted by the U.S. postal service. The service has grown steadily. By 1901, the mileage had increased to over 100,000; the cost was $1,750,321 and over 37,000 carriers were employed. In 1910 the mileage was 993,068; cost $36,915,000; carriers 40,997. In 1913 came the introduction of parcel post delivery, which caused another boom in rural deliveries. Parcel post service allowed the distribution of national newspapers and magazines, and was responsible for millions of dollars of sales in mail-order merchandise to customers in rural areas. In 1930 there were 43,278 rural routes serving about 6,875,321 families—that is about 25,471,735 persons. The cost was $106,338,341.[9] In 1916, the Rural Post "Good" Roads Act authorized federal funds for rural post roads.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Rural_Free_Delivery_What_Does_Rural_Free_Delivery_Mean_Rural_Free_Delivery_Meaning
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